Oscar Wilde2

  • The Nightingale and The Rose (Wilde Short Stories) Vocabulary

    to clasp to hold tightly wretched very unhappy or ill to flutter to fly through the air with short, quick, light movements to soar to fly high in the sky scythe a sharp instrument with a curved blade for cutting grass etc. It is a traditional symbol of death. to… View Article

  • THE CANTERVILLE GHOST by Oscar Wilde – D’conv. class – QUOTES & ACTIONS IN PICTURES!!!!

    The Otis' family consisted of six members. As they approached Canterville Chase suddenly the sky became cloudy. "A blood stain on the library floor!" Mrs Umney screamed with terror and fainted. "My dear sir, please, put some oil on your chains." "No ghost in history has been treated like this."… View Article

  • The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde–Vocabulary 1

    column (architeture) a tall upright structure used to support another structure above it. statue figure of human or animal gilded covered with gold sapphire a precious blue stone sword-hilt sword handle swallow a type of bird tear when you cry your eyes are filed with tears weep cry drenched cover… View Article

  • The Remarkable Rocket (Oscar Wilde Short Stories)

    to rejoice to be full of joy or show great pleasure ermine a weasel that has white fur in the winter. They live in very cold regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. pyrotechnist someone who uses or makes fireworks and is responsible for firework displays. prejudice an opinion that… View Article

  • Grade 10 Unit 6 – Choosing the Right Word

    Was Oscar Wilde being (*IRONIC, DEFT*) when he said that he could resist everything except temptation? ironic There's a world of difference between a helpful research assistant and an (*EXPLICIT, OFFICIOUS*) one! officious She has the kind of (*SUPPLE, VENAL*) personalty that can easily adapt itself to a wide variety… View Article

  • Quotes and Poems

    Dr. Seuss - Troubles I learned there are troubles of more than one kind. Some come from ahead, others come from behind. But I've bought a big bat. I'm all ready, you see. Now all my troubles are going to have trouble with me. Jewish Proverb (burden, shoulders) I ask… View Article

  • Part 1: A Comedy of Manners: The Importance of Being Earnest

    d the excerpt from Act I of The Importance of Being Earnest. Jack. Oh, Gwendolen is as right as a trivet. As far as she is concerned, we are engaged. Her mother is perfectly unbearable. Never met such a Gorgon . . . I don't really know what a Gorgon… View Article

  • Facts about Oscar Wilde

    A famous English Victorian writer Who was Oscar Wilde? 1837 - 1901 in Britain What does 'Victorian' mean? 11 short stories How many short stories for children did he write? a fable/a short story used to teach a moral what kind of story is 'The Happy Prince'? yes, he was… View Article

  • Advanced – Oscar Wilde – Personality adjectives

    timid inarticulated patronizing Condescending, having a superior manner, treating as an inferior snobbish elitist haughty Arrogant and superior earnest serious in intention or effort overbearing domineering, haughty, bullying; overpowering, predominant prejudiced being biased or having a belief or attitude formed beforehand witty funny and clever (as Chandler Bing in the… View Article

  • Aesthetics Key Terms

    Intersubjective: pg 11 (F) David Hume -People with taste tend to agree with eachother Example: (Roses=beautiful, cockroaches=ugly) Significant Form: pg 15 (A) Clive Bell -a particular combinations of lines & colors that stir our aesthetic emotions -many rivals to this involving Enlightenment thinkers like Kant & Hume purposiveness without a… View Article

  • Importance of Being Earnest – Oscar Wilde

    P: Earnest Earnest/John/(Jack) Worthing G: To win the hand of Gwendolyn in Marriage. Earnest/John/(Jack) Worthing F: Protagonist. Example of what one must do to be "earnest" in such a repressive society as Victorianism. Earnest/John/(Jack) Worthing P: "City" sophisticated Gwendolyn Fairfax G: To marry someone by the name of Earnest. Gwendolyn… View Article

  • English literary devices

    Figures of speech are expressions that stretch words beyond their literal meanings. By connecting or juxtaposing different sounds and thoughts, figures of speech increase the breadth and subtlety of expression. Alliteration The repetition of similar sounds, usually consonants, at the beginning of words. (alliterative) Aposiopesis A breaking-off of speech, usually… View Article

  • Oscar Wilde: Author Background

    What is Oscar Wilde's full name? -Oscar Fingal O'Flaherie Willis Wilde When was Oscar Wilde born? -October 16th, 1854 Where was Oscar Wilde born? -Dublin, Ireland What were his father's occupations? -Surgeon and Author What were his mother's occupations? -Novelist and Poet How many siblings did Oscar Wilde have? -2… View Article

  • Victorian Age/Oscar Wilde

    Oscar's Full Name Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde Oscar spent how many years in prison? 2 What do they call Jack in the city? Ernest Who is Jack's love interest? Gwendolen Algernon's love interest? Cecily How old was Oscar when he died? 46 Where was Oscar born? Dublin, Ireland Was… View Article

  • The Selfish Giant by Oscar Wilde

    delicate Easily broken or damaged, fragile. Prosecuted To initiate or conduct a criminal case against. linnet Small finch-like bird with yellow throat. bore To weary by tediousness or dullness. personification A figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes Simile A comparison… View Article