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Elements Named From Famous Scientists

Curium
named in honor of Pierre and Marie Curie for their investigations in radio activity
Curium

Einsteinium
named after the brilliant physicist Albert Einstein, Time magazine’s “Man of the Century”
Einsteinium

Fermium
honors the great Italian nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi
Fermium

Gadolinium
first isolated from the mineral gadolinium. Gadolinite was named after John Gadolin, a chemist from Finland
Gadolinium

Mendelevium
named after Demitri Mendeleev, the Russian scientist who is considered to be the “Father of the Periodic Table of Elements”
Mendelevium

Nobelium
honors Alfred Nobel, a Swedish scientist, who was the inventor of dynamite. He was also responsible for establishing the Nobel Prizes
Nobelium

Samarium
this element gets his name from the mineral samarkite from which the element was first discovered. Samarkite was named after a Russian engineer and mine official by the name of Colonel V.E. Samarsky
Samarium

Rutherfordium
named after Lord Ernest Rutherford who was born in New Zealand and did his research in England. There he developed the nuclear theory of the atom and discovered the proton; he is considered to be the founder of nuclear physics
Rutherfordium

Seaborgium
named after the great American nuclear chemist Glenn T. Seaborg, who was responsible for synthesizing many of the transuranium elements (those beyond uranium) now found on the periodic table. Seaborgium is the only element ever named after a person who was actually alive at the time of the official naming. Such a practice had been in conflict with IUPAC policies prior to that time
Seaborgium

Bohrium
named after Niels Bohr,the Danish physicist who formulated the quantum theory of the electronic structure of the hydrogen atom and the origin of the spectral lines of hydrogen and helium
Bohrium

Meitnerium
named after the great Austrian female physicist, Lise Meitner. Her discoveries in nuclear physics played a major role in developing nuclear energy
Meitnerium

Roentgenium
named after the German physicist, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. His study of cathode rays led to his discovery of x-rays in 1895 and the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901
Roentgenium

Copernicium
honors Nicolaus Copernicus, a scientist and astronomer who lived from 1473 to 1543. His heliocentric model of the universe showed that the Earth orbits the sun, changing the way the world was viewed
Copernicium

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